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The World Land-Bridge

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Prominent leaders endorse LaRouche’s New Bretton Woods


The following list of elected officials, scientists, professors, military leaders, musicians, authors, labor leaders, and more have endorsed the Schiller Institute’s petition, The Leaders of the United States, China, Russia, and India Must Take Action!  To read the full petition, or add your own signature, click here.

 

Elected Representatives active or former federal, state, and local elected officials

Government Officials active or former military, diplomats, ambassadors, etc

Organizational Leaders leaders in labor, agriculture, industry, and business organizations

Political, Religious, or Social Leaders 

Leaders in the Arts and Sciences scientists, technologists, professors, and musicians

 


We, the undersigned, appeal to President Trump, President Putin, President Xi Jinping and Prime Minister Modi, to convoke an emergency summit in order to create a New Bretton Woods global monetary system.


 

Elected Representatives
(active or former federal, state, and local elected officials)

Senator Richard Black (USA) • Sitting Virginia State Senator (Republican, District 13)

Hon. Gianni Tonelli (Italy) • Sitting member of the Italian Chamber of Deputies, Lega Nord party

Prof. Ivo Christov (Bulgaria) • Sitting Member of the Bulgarian parliament for the Socialist Party, member of the Foreign Policy, and Science and Education committees

U.S. Senator Mike Gravel (USA) • Two-term Democratic senator for the state of Alaska (1969-1981); famously read classified Pentagon Papers at a Congressional hearing to expose failure of the Vietnam War policy

Dr. Natalia Vitrenko (Ukraine) • Chair of the Progressive Socialist Party of Ukraine; member of parliament with the Socialist Party of Ukraine (1995-1998) and then with the Progressive Socialist Party of Ukraine (1998-2002)

Congressman Cornelius Gallagher (USA) • Democratic Congressman representing New Jersey (1959-1972)

Viktor Marchenko (Ukraine) • Former member of parliament, Progressive Socialist Party of Ukraine

Dr. Kirk Meighoo (Trinidad & Tobago) • Former Senator, Trinidad & Tobago; member of the advisory board of the Caribbean Integrationist

Senator William “Bill” Owens (USA) • Former Massachusetts State Senator (1975-1982, 1989-1992), Democratic party

Souad Sbai (Italy) • Former member of Italian National Parliament

Commissioner Robert Van Hee (USA) • Sitting County Commissioner, District 4 Redwood County, Minnesota

Councilwoman Elena Fontana (Italy) • Former City Councilwoman, Italia-Montichiari (Brescia)

Mayor Henry Gonzalez (USA) • Former Mayor of South Gate, California, founder and former President of the Labor Council for Latin American Advancement

 

Government Officials
(active or former military, diplomats, ambassadors, etc)

General Edwin de la Fuente Jeria (Bolivia) • Former Commander-in-Chief, Bolivian Armed Forces

Dr. Julio C. Gonzalez (Argentina) • Former Technical Secretary to the Argentine Presidency

Major General (ret) Kostas X. Konstantinidis (Greece) • Cofounder of the Non Governmental Organization “Amphiktyonia of Ecumenical Hellenism”

Alain Corvez (France) • Advisor on international strategy

James George Jatras (USA) • Former diplomat; former advisor to Republican Senate leadership

Jacques Bacamurwanko (Guinea) • Former Ambassador of Burundi to the USA; Capacity Building Expert (Chef du Département “Suivi-Evaluation”) National Capacity Building Secretariat

Ambassador Leonidas Chrysanthopoulos (Greece) • Former ambassador;  former Secretary General of the Organization of the Black Sea Economic Cooperation

 

Organizational Leaders
(leaders in labor, agriculture, industry, and business organizations)

Daisuke Kotegawa (Japan) • Research Director, Canon Institute; Former Executive Director for Japan IMF

Dr. Walter Formento (Argentina) • Director, Center for Economic and Political Research

Jean-Pierre Gerard (France) • Former member of the Council of Monetary Policies of the Banque de France; entrepreneur

John Lampl (USA) • Vice-President (retired) of the AFL-CIO, North Dakota; former District President of North Dakota Democratic Party

Rich (John R) Anderson (USA) • Former director of the National Cattlemen’s Association; former member of the Texas Republican Executive Committee; former County Chairman of the Republican Party

Trustee George Bioletto (USA) • International Association of Machinists, Long Beach, CA

Francis Kelly (USA) • Farm Bureau in Wyoming; county chair in the Republican Party

Tate Ulsaker Nelson (New Zealand) • International Trade Consultant; founder of Direct Info

Denys Pluvinage (France) • President of Apopsix Editing company

 

Political, Religious, or Social Leaders

Helga Zepp-LaRouche (Germany) • Founder and president of the Schiller Institute; founder and chairwoman of the German Bürgerrechtsbewegung Solidarität party (BüSo) (Civil Rights Movement Solidarity)

Fouad Alghaffari (Yemen) • Head of the Preparatory Committee of the New Silk Road Party in Yemen; President of the Yemini BRICS Youth Cabinet

Reverend Andrew Ashdown (UK) • Anglican Priest; author, The Very Stones Cry Out; leader of the first British community group to visit Aleppo following the beginning of the Syrian conflict

Ellen Brown (USA) • Attorney; chairman of the Public Banking Institute; author of twelve books, including Web of Debt and The Public Bank Solution

Ali Rastbeen (France) • President of the Geopolitical Academy of Paris

Chris Fogarty (USA) • Former Vice President of the Friends of Irish Freedom; author of The Mass Graves of Ireland: 1845-1850 and Ireland 1845-1850: the Perfect Holocaust, and Who Kept it Perfect

Fred Huenefeld, Jr. (USA) • Louisiana State Democratic Party Committee

Jacques Cheminade (France) • President of Solidarité et Progrès

Tom Gillesberg (Denmark) • Chairman of The Schiller Institute in Denmark

Liliana Gorini (Italy) • Chairwoman of Movimento Internazionale per i Diritti Civili – Solidarietà (MoviSol)

Antonio “Butch” Valdes (Philippines) • Founder of the Philippines LaRouche Society; Initiator of the Citizens National Guard, Philippines

Abdus Sattar Ghazali (USA) • Editor, American Muslim Perspective; former News Editor of Daily News, Kuwait; former correspondent of Associated Press and the Daily Dawn of Pakistan

Michael P. Collins (USA) • Author of Saving American Manufacturing and The Manufacturer’s Guide to Business Marketing; writer for Forbes Magazine and Industry Week

George/Vladislav Krasnow (USA/Russia) • Russian American Goodwill Association

Mike Robinson (UK) • Editor, UK Column, Plymouth, UK

Dr. James Hufferd, (USA) • 911 Truth Grassroots Organization, Adel, Iowa

Mary Sullivan (USA) • Irish American activist, Chicago, Illinois

 

Leaders in the Arts and Sciences
(scientists, technologists, professors, and musicians)

Dr. Eduardo M.A. Peixoto (Brazil) • Ph.D. and Prof. of Chemistry, University of São Paulo; former Superintendent of Technical Consultancy, Nat’l Development Bank (BNDES); former Brazilian representative to WHO

Dr. Jorge Alberto Montenegro (Argentina) • Professor of International Trade, FASTA University

Professor Bong Wie (USA) • Vance Coffman Endowed Chair Professor of Aerospace Engineering at Iowa State University; founding director of the Asteroid Deflection Research Collaboration

Gian Marco Sanna (UK) • Founder of the Geminiani Project, focused on restoring the original classical music tuning of 432 hz; leader of the Camerata Geminiani

Dr. Rainer Sandau (Germany) • Technical Director Satellites and Space Applications, International Academy of Astronautics (IAA)

Chief Scientist Wayne Moore, Ph.D (USA) • Accel Algorithmics; NASA (ret.)

Tom Wysmuller (USA) • NASA (ret.); meteorologist

Professor Lilya Takumbetova (Russia) • Retired Associate Professor at Bashkir State Pedagogical University

Professor Cathy M. Helgason, M.D. (USA) • Retired Professor of Neurology University of Illinois College of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois

Roger Boyer (USA) • Retired principal science and engineering technician at the Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)


Indian Scholar: The Belt and Road Came from Lyndon and Helga LaRouche

Aug. 28 -Mahmud Ali, an Indian scholar currently at the Institute of China Studies at the University of Malaya in Kuala Lumpur, posted an article on LinkedIn titled “America’s Foundational Contributions to China’s Belt & Road Initiative (BRI)” on Aug. 27. He ridicules the “disdain” from Western officials and media towards the Belt and Road Initiative, and stating that the slanders are “repeated {ad nauseam},” especially in the U.S. But, he continues, the concept “originated in America, with U.S. visionaries envisaging, promoting and advancing the cause of a united Euro-Asian economic space, as early as the late 1980s, before politicians and their assorted advisors had begun considering the possibility of the collapse of the Soviet Union, or the end of the Cold War. It was that American intellectual spark, nurtured by a few farsighted men and women, which illuminated the new world of possibilities. Without it, and direct intervention by governments and multilateral agencies based in America and its allies, there would probably be no BRI today.”

Then, under the subhead “American Prophets Imagine a New Silk Road,” he writes that despite the geopolitical thinking of most people in the West, based on the concepts of Halford Mackinder, “Western thinkers operating outside state-funded national security establishments envisioned a non-competitive, indeed collaborative, vision of the future. One of them, the U.S. politician and co-founder, with his wife Helga LaRouche, of the Washington-based Schiller Institute, Lyndon LaRouche, promoted such a vision, with some success in influencing segments of trans-Atlantic opinion. In October 1988, LaRouche briefed the media in West Berlin on ‘U.S. Policy Toward the Reunification of Germany,’ prophesying the collapse of COMECON economies, and urging food-support to Poland so that a majority of Germans on both sides desired reunification. In December, he assigned a group of Schiller Institute specialists to examine prospects for establishing a Paris-Berlin-Vienna productive triangle. In January 1990, Schiller Institute published LaRouche’s book on a proposed 320,000 sq.km. European economic area comprising a population of 92 million concentrated in 10 large industrial areas, from which he envisaged infrastructural corridors, linked with high-speed railways, radiating in all directions, providing a basis for upgrading living standards across Eurasia.”

Ali goes on to describe Schiller Institute conferences and {EIR} articles between 1991 and 1996 (noting that LaRouche was then in prison), when Helga Zepp-LaRouche presented her speech at the May 7-9, 1996 “Symposium on Economic Development along the New Euro-Asia Continental Bridge” in Beijing on May 8, 1996, titled “Building the Silk Road Land-Bridge: The Basis for Mutual Security Interests of Asia and Europe.”

Then, he writes: “In January 1997, Lyndon LaRouche addressed a Washington conference, urging the Clinton Administration to sponsor a New Bretton Woods system, reorganizing the world economy to prevent disruptive boom-bust cycles, and recognize the global merit of the Eurasian Land-Bridge program. Reinforcing and explaining her husband’s persistent thematic refrain, Helga LaRouche published a commentary titled, `Eurasian Land-Bridge: A New Era for Mankind,’ which was widely circulated across the Atlantic by the Schiller Foundation [sic].” He adds that Helga LaRouche addressed a second conference in Beijing in November 1997. “By then,” he continues, “railway connectivity between coastal China, Central Asia and Russia was a reality; Europe beckoned.”

He next reports on a conference in India organized by Schiller representative Ramtanu Maitra, with leading figures from Russia, China and India, where they “established a Triangular Association with the goal of promoting Indo-Russian-Chinese cooperation in forging a shared vision of Eurasia’s post-Cold War future of peace, progress and prosperity. The effort failed for a combination of distractions and difficulties: fallout from the Asian Economic Crisis, the September 2001 al-Qaeda attacks on New York and Washington and America’s subsequent Global War on Terrorism, wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, and then, the Great Recession. Nonetheless, seeds had been sown in the febrile post-Cold War intellectual hotbeds. Ideas analysed at Schiller’s many conferences and events began gelling into policy-frameworks in early 21st century.”

Ali then reviews other Western interventions into Central Asia, including a number of “bilateral investment treaties” the U.S. signed with coutries in Central Asia and the South Caucasus, aimed at capturing the energy resources and breaking them away from Russia and China, and the so-called “New Silk Road Initiative” sponsored by Hillary Clinton (based on keeping Central Asia out of Russia and China influence), and the Lower Mekong Initiative, also by the U.S. State Department.

However, Ali makes a point that the U.S. initiatives were both “much more modest” than the LaRouche plans, or of Xi Jinping’s plan announced in September 2013, and that the U.S. “more candidly advertised their geopolitical drivers.” On the other hand, he concludes, “Beijing emphasized its economic, indeed geoeconomic focus.”


Xi Jinping to BRICS Business Forum: “New Type of International Relations” Needed

July 25 –Speaking today in Johannesburg to the BRICS Business Forum, Chinese President Xi Jinping laid out the choices before his audience, stressing that “the international community has reached a new crossroads,” while especially emphasizing the role the BRICS must play in ensuring the development of Africa. Will the world choose cooperation or confrontation? he asked, sounding many of the themes that Schiller Institute President Helga Zepp-LaRouche has recently emphasized about whether humanity will rise to the occasion to ensure Africa’s development and fight for “a new type of international relations and a shared future for mankind.”

Xi focused on several points, chief among them the the need to develop and protect a multilateral world, in which all countries have the right to develop, pursuit of science and technology to “seize” development opportunities, and pursuit of the Belt and Road Initiative, “to create new opportunities of social and economic development for participating countries… It is our sincere hope that other BRICS countries, African countries and other emerging markets and developing countries, will forge strong partnerships with this Initiative so that its benefits will reach more countries and its peoples.” He also outlined China’s own contributions to world peace and development.

The Chinese leader placed great emphasis on the pursuit of science and technology as a driver for economic development. “Science and technology, as the primary production forces, have provided inexhaustible power, driving progress of human civilization. Humanity had made giant leaps forward as it progressed from an agricultural civilization to an industrial civilization.” And, “the world today has once again reached a critical historic juncture. In the unfolding new round of scientific and technological revolution and industrial transformation, new things will inevitably emerge and take the place of old ones… if countries succeed in seizing opportunities that have presented themselves, they will be able to achieve new dynamic growth and deliver better lives to their people.”

And Africa? Xi pointed to the fact that Africa is home “to more developing countries than any other continent, Africa has more development potential than any other region in the world. We should strengthen cooperation with Africa, support its development and make BRICS-Africa cooperation a model for South-South cooperation. We should actively carry out cooperation with African countries in such areas as poverty reduction, food security, innovation, infrastructure development and industrialization in a way compatible with their national conditions. We should help African countries develop their economic structure, contribute to the implementation of Agenda 2063 of the African Union and thus enable Africa, an ancient continent, to gain strong vitality.”

China and African countries, Xi said, “are destined to be good friends, good brothers and good partners, and China-Africa cooperation stands as a fine example of South-South cooperation.” He pointed out that the September summit in Beijing of the Forum on China-African Cooperation, titled “China and Africa: Toward an Even Stronger Community with a Shared Future through Win-Win Cooperation,” intends to “enhance complementarity between China-Africa joint efforts to pursue the Belt and Road Initiative, the 2030 Agenda and the 2063 Agenda on the one hand and the development strategies of African countries on the other. This will enable China and Africa to pursue high quality and high standard cooperation for mutual benefit and common development.”

In concluding, Xi recalled that 2018 marks the centennial of the birth of the revered South African leader Nelson Mandela. Reciting one of Mandela’s famous sayings, “After climbing a great hill, one only finds that there are many more hills to climb,” he remarked that this should serve as inspiration for the BRICS. “Indeed, the history of BRICS cooperation is a journey of our five countries climbing great hills only to reach new heights. I am convinced that when our five countries forge ahead together, we will scale new peaks, reach new heights, and make even greater contribution to peace and development of mankind.”


Thai Rails Chosen for Japan-China Cooperation on New Silk Road

July 22 – The Tokyo daily {Asahi Shimbun} reported July 20, “Japan, China Set To Work Out Joint Development Projects.” The paper reported that a committee Japan and China created in May to coordinate their investments along the Belt and Road Initiative launched by China in 2013, will hold its first meeting in Beijing in September. The meeting “will discuss economic cooperation projects in third countries related to China’s One Belt, One Road Initiative,” {Asahi Shimbun} said.

And its sources in Japan indicated that railroad construction in Thailand is the leading first candidate project to be tackled jointly by Japanese and Chinese companies, with credit aid from both governments.

As {EIR} has reported, high-speed rail lines both north-south within Thailand and east-west connecting it to other Southeast Asian nations, have already been projected with Chinese aid.
The committee is expected to be headed by Hiroto Izumi, a special advisor to Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, on the Japanese side, and Ning Jizhe, vice chairman of the pre-eminent National Development and Reform Commission, on the Chinese side, according to the paper. It said the two countries “are aiming to decide on joint projects through the committee and announce them in conjunction with the Japan-China summit to be held later this year when Prime Minister Shinzo Abe visits the country, sources said.”


Now Available: The New Silk Road Becomes the World Land-Bridge, Vol. II

We are happy to announce the publication of this second volume, “The New Silk Road Becomes the World Land-Bridge: A Shared Future for Humanity,” in which we bring you an updated picture of the progress of China’s Belt and Road Initiative, including detailed region-by-region analysis and newly updated maps.


Schiller Institute Conference in Bad Soden: Panel 2

The second panel of the Schiller Institute conference of June 30-July 1 entitled, “How the Belt and Road Initiative is Changing Africa,” features an in-depth look at the great potential for economic growth in the continents of Africa and Southwest Asia made possible by the spirit of China’s Belt and Road Initiative. Presentations by diplomats, economic experts and historians focused on the refugee crisis, the need for economic development to address the root of war and the displacement of people, and the potential for Africa to become the world’s next economic superpower with the implementation of great projects like the Transaqua water project.


Portugal Working To Put the Atlantic Ocean on the Belt and Road Map

June 5 – A three-page spread on “Portugal in China’s New Silk Road” in the May 31 issue of Portugal’s {Expresso} daily writes that “the Atlantic is missing from the current map of the initiative,” but Portuguese Belt and Road researcher Paulo Duarte tells them “the Atlantic Ocean is a space in transformation…. The trend will be for China to engage in this ocean in coming years.” Portugal offers “a string of pearls” of deepwater seaports on the European continent and on its Atlantic island such as the Azores, for this initiative, Jorge Rocha de Matos, president of the Fundacão AIP, a non-profit promoting private sector companies, told {Expresso}.

{Expresso} interviewed Portugal’s Minister of the Sea Ana Paulo Vitorino, who reported that Portugal and China are advancing on a memorandum on a “blue partnership,” dealing with everything related to the oceans and sea economy. The MOU will outline a portfolio of joint research projects on state-of-the-art maritime biotechnologies, deep-sea technologies, etc.

Portugal’s primary capital is its geography, when it comes to the BRI, she said, citing Portugal’s “strategic centrality. …. Portugal is at the interface between Europe and the Atlantic.” the reported that China is interested not only in building up Sines port, where the China Communications Construction Co. will be a bidder in the tender for expanding Sines which will be launched later this year. Increased Chinese activity here will turn this port, once considered a “white elephant” into a crown jewel, she said. But “China is not only looking at Sines;” it is also studying investments to upgrade the entire national port system, she said.


China To Drive Int’l Syria Rebuild

April 30, 2018 – More than 140 factories have restarted
production in Damascus’s Fadlon industrial zone in southern
Syria, and another 100 production facilities are being repaired
now, the Syrian Arab News Agency (SANA) reported today. The
industrial zone of Fadlon comprises half of the industries of
Damascus. Textile, chemical, clothing, medicine, steel, and
others have rehabilitated their facilities and begun production.
The rehabilitation of water, electricity, sewerage, telephone
lines, and other necessary services have assisted this zone in
going back to work and its factories to produce again.

Xie Xiaoyan, the Chinese government’s Special Envoy on the
Syrian issue, has signalled Beijing’s willingness “to do its
best” to contribute to ordinary Syrians returning to a normal
life. The envoy estimated that at least $260 billion in aid money
is needed to restore the devastated nation, and that this is a
task for the entire international community: “Many people have
died; millions have lost their homes or become refugees, and they
all need humanitarian aid. As a member of the UN Security
Council, China has always paid attention to providing
humanitarian assisstance both to Syrian citizens and refugees in
the form of goods, medicine, food, and money.”

Xie promised that “China is ready to become a driving force
in this process and to involve its companies in the restoration
work in Syria as soon as the security situation improves there.
Apart from China and Russia, the countries of the region should
also take part in the process, because only together will we be
able restore Syria,” Xie said.


Afghanistan Looks to India and China To Build Rail

May 1 -Informed sources in New Delhi have told the Indian daily, {The Statesmen} that senior officials from India and China will meet soon to discuss “the broad contours” of their joint
cooperation on development projects in Afghanistan which Prime Minister Narendra Modi and President Xi Jinping discussed at their two-day informal summit in Wuhan last week. Afghani Ministry of Economy spokesperson Suhrab Bahman gave an idea of the scope of development that could result on Apirl 29, reporting that one of the joint projects will be the construction of a railroad connecting Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, Iran and China. That exciting potential was reported by Afghan TOLOnews.  Bahman said, in TOLOnews’ report, “that China is interested in giving Afghanistan more share in the ‘Belt and Road’ project connecting China with Central Asia.”

Such joint work will proceed, even though India is not likely to formally endorse the Belt and Road Initiative by name anytime soon, similar stories appearing today in {The Statesman} and {New Indian Express} report.

The {New Indian Express} cited Chinese Vice Foreign Minister Kong Xuanyou’s statement to reporters after the Wuhan summit, that “when it comes to connectivity, China and India do not have any principled disagreements.” He said that the two leaders “did not talk about the specific wording or expression of the Belt and Road, many things China and India are planning to do are in keeping with what the Belt and Road Initiative stands for.”

Afghanistan signed a Memorandum of Understanding with China on the BRI in May 2016, while India is already helping build a road and rail network to connect the Iranian port of Chandahar with Afghanistan, and then up north into Central Asia.

The other “connectivity” project where India and China are already cooperating cited by both newspapers is the Bangladesh-China-India-Myanmar (BCIM) economic corridor. China considers the BCIM as an important part of the Belt and Road; Indian diplomats emphasize that the project started before the BRI.

The {New Indian Express} asked a senior Indian diplomat if the joint project in Afghanistan implies that India might take a “softer” stance toward the BRI when Modi attends the June Shanghai Cooperation Organization summit in China?

“Most unlikely,” the diplomat said. “Given that we have elections next year, any such move would be seen as a climbdown by the electorate. We will continue to oppose the CPEC [China-Pakistan Economic Corridor]. But does that mean we can’t join other segments of the BRI if they align with our own interests?”


Schiller Institute’s Stephan Ossenkopp Interviewed by Chinese Media

March 31, 2018 – The German-language {China.org} journal interviewed “German China expert Stephan Ossenkopp” two days ago, on the question of the U.S. Import tariffs against China. He said that the continuous, successful and most of all peaceful rise of China is making those western elites nervous that do not want to give up their hegemony in international trade regulations. Punitive tariffs and investment bans will however not change this historic trend. The time of unilateral global systems is past, he said.

Stephan O

The time of unilateral global systems is past

The enormous trade deficit of the USA viz. China is the result of a paradigm change of the US economy away from investments in innovative infrastructure and production, but into speculative financial products, Ossenkopp explained. If Trump really wants to make America strong again, he should reactivate the Glass-Steagall Act, end the disastrous Wall Street speculation and revitalize his infrastructure and space program with a focus on technologically advanced industrial production.

Trump, Ossenkopp added, should utilize the chances offered by the Silk Road initiative, to bring the USA back on the right track with investments in the real economy.


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